A corpus-based study of agrammatic aphasia: New evidence for the potential prominent part played by adaptive strategies in these patients' oral production

Abstract : This study investigates the plausibility of "adaptation theory" in oral agrammatic production by means of large and systematic corpora studies. The hypothesis of agrammatism being, at least partly, an adaptive behaviour is thus tested, following some assumptions put forward by Nespoulous (2000) and Hofstede and Kolk (1994). Variability in the use of strategies, combined with the improvement or decrease of fluency and / or grammatical accuracy, lead us to suggest that some "performance rules" are very likely to reflect linguistic output adjustments we observed, which may be due to the agrammatic speakers' adaptive abilities. The intervention of monitoring (focused attention on form) might be responsible for the inconsistent use of strategies.
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Halima Sahraoui, Jean-Luc Nespoulous. A corpus-based study of agrammatic aphasia: New evidence for the potential prominent part played by adaptive strategies in these patients' oral production. 48th Academy of Aphasia Meeting, Oct 2010, Athènes, Greece. pp.115-116, ⟨10.1016/j.sbspro.2010.08.058⟩. ⟨hal-00961601⟩

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